Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a web site. It is a large portion of Internet traffic. This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth — not all web traffic is welcome.

Some companies offer advertising schemes that, in return for increased web traffic (visitors), pay for screen space on the site. Sites also often aim to increase their web traffic through inclusion on search engines and through search engine optimization.

Analyzing web traffic

Web analytics is the measurement of the behavior of visitors to a website. In a commercial context, it especially refers to the measurement of which aspects of the website work towards the business objectives of Internet marketing initiatives; for example, which landing pages encourage people to make a purchase. Notable vendors of web analytics software and services include Webtrends, Coremetrics, Omniture, and Google Analytics.

Measuring web traffic

Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of web sites and individual pages or sections within a site.
Web traffic can be analyzed by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the web site – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the web site can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the web site.[1]

Web traffic is also sometimes measured by packet sniffing and thus gaining random samples of traffic data from which to extrapolate information about web traffic as a whole across total Internet usage.

Web sites like Alexa Internet produce traffic rankings and statistics based on those people who access the sites while using the Alexa toolbar. The difficulty with this is that it's not looking at the complete traffic picture for a site. Large sites usually hire the services of companies like Nielsen NetRatings, but their reports are available only by subscription.

Have you ever used a search engine? Do you wonder how to get listed?

This page will help you to get listed in the most popular search engines.


 

SEO – Search Engine Optimization

Search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of improving the ranking (visibility) of a website in search engines. The higher (or more frequently) a web site is displayed in a search engine list (like Google), the more visitors it is expected to receive.

SEO considers how search engines work, what people search for, and which search terms (words) are typed. Optimizing a website may involve editing the content to increase its relevance to specific keywords. Promoting a site to increase the number of links, is another SEO tactic.

Effective search engine optimization may require changes to the HTML source code of a site and to the site content. SEO tactics should be incorporated into the website development and especially into the menus and navigation structure.

Another class of techniques, known as black hat SEO or spamdexing, uses methods such as link farms, keyword stuffing and article spinning that degrade both the relevance of search results and the quality of user-experience with search engines. Search engines look for sites that employ these techniques in order to remove them from their indices.


 

Submit Your Site to Search Engines

Web search engines (like Google) automatically add new web sites to their search index every time they crawl the web.

If your web site is new and unknown, it may take some time before your site is "discovered".

Luckily most search engines invites you to submit your site: *

Google: http://www.google.com/addurl.html

Yahoo: http://search.yahoo.com/info/submit.html

Bing: http://www.bing.com/webmaster/SubmitSitePage.aspx

Open Directory: http://www.dmoz.org/help/submit.html

Normally you will have to enter the full URL of your site including the http:// prefix.

Example: http://www.mysite.com/

When you submit your site to a search engine, you only need to specify the top-level (home) page. You do not need to submit each page. The search engine will find the rest based on your links (keep your navigation menus tidy).

Sometimes you can also add keywords that describe the page, but don't expect these to affect how your site is ranked or listed.

Search engines indexes are updated on a regular basis. Changes to your site will be updated over time (monthly) and dead pages and links will disappear.

* Not all submitted URLs will be added, and you cannot predict or guarantee when or if your site will appear in a search result.

 Posted on : October 15, 2011